the casual paleontologist

pa·le·on·tol·o·gy: noun. a science dealing with the life of past geological periods as known from fossil remains.

Despite being paleontology centric this blog should also serve as a resource for, and window into, other areas of study to help us gain an understanding of how our earth and the life on it has been shaped over the past 4.5 billion years.

Please contribute by asking us a question or submitting something you find interesting! This blog is run by and intended for people who love the sciences surrounding prehistoric earth and want to share what they find interesting and learn something new.
amnhnyc:

New research suggests that dinosaurs fell victim to a “perfect storm” of events.
Dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in time, according to new research conducted in part by the American Museum of Natural History. The study, published today in Biological Reviews, builds a new narrative of the prehistoric creatures’ demise some 66 million years ago when a six-mile- (10-kilometer-) wide asteroid struck what is now Mexico.
Read the full story. 

amnhnyc:

New research suggests that dinosaurs fell victim to a “perfect storm” of events.

Dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in time, according to new research conducted in part by the American Museum of Natural History. The study, published today in Biological Reviews, builds a new narrative of the prehistoric creatures’ demise some 66 million years ago when a six-mile- (10-kilometer-) wide asteroid struck what is now Mexico.

Read the full story

amnhnyc:

Don’t get too close, this #fossilfriday has spikes!
This heavily armored, highly spiked ankylosaur is Edmontonia rugosidens, a dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. This mount shows the front limb positioned as it may have been in life. Although it certainly wasn’t a sprinter, Edmontonia could probably move quickly.
Find this fossil in the Museum’s Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

amnhnyc:

Don’t get too close, this #fossilfriday has spikes!

This heavily armored, highly spiked ankylosaur is Edmontonia rugosidens, a dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. This mount shows the front limb positioned as it may have been in life. Although it certainly wasn’t a sprinter, Edmontonia could probably move quickly.

Find this fossil in the Museum’s Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

10 Thundering Facts About Apatosaurus (aka: “The Not-Brontosaurus”)

eragornz asked: Your blog is literal heaven to me and I thank you very much for having it :)

I’m glad to hear that!  :)

amnhnyc:

An allosaurus for your #fossilfriday! 
This saurischian dinosaur is shown feeding on a carcass with bones marked by grooves, possibly from the teeth or claws of the 140-million-year-old predator. Allosaurus teeth found nearby inspired the idea for the mount. This allosaurus can be found in the Museum’s Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs. 
Learn more.

amnhnyc:

An allosaurus for your #fossilfriday! 

This saurischian dinosaur is shown feeding on a carcass with bones marked by grooves, possibly from the teeth or claws of the 140-million-year-old predator. Allosaurus teeth found nearby inspired the idea for the mount. This allosaurus can be found in the Museum’s Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Learn more.

10 Frilled Facts About Protoceratops

10 Facts About Ankylosaurus

Man gets 3 months for smuggling dinosaur skeleton

archaeologicalnews:

A federal judge in New York has sentenced a Florida fossils dealer to three months in prison for smuggling a 70-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus skeleton out of Mongolia.

Eric Prokopi (proh-KAHP’-ee) of Gainesville also must serve three months in community confinement.

The government said Prokopi smuggled the bones from the Gobi Desert into the U.S. and then assembled them.

The skeleton was sold by Dallas-based Heritage Auctions for more than $1 million. The government said the dinosaur skeleton was mislabeled as reptile bones from Great Britain. The deal was suspended.
The skeleton has been returned to Mongolia. (source)